Import expo to expand its equipment area

Yuan Luhang
The third China International Import Expo will highlight energy conservation and environmental protection in an area that will exceed last year's 60,000 square meters.
Yuan Luhang
Import expo to expand its equipment area

The third China International Import Expo will expand the equipment exhibition area and highlight energy conservation and environmental protection, according to China International Import Expo Bureau and National Exhibition and Convention Center (Shanghai).

Last year’s equipment exhibition area was 60,000 square meters.

Other development trends in manufacturing will be highlighted, including high-speed precision, flexible integration and green and energy-saving, apart from automation and smart manufacturing.

Sun Chenghai, deputy director of the bureau said 70 percent of the planned exhibition area had already attracted 1,100 exhibitors.

The energy conservation and environmental protection sector, designed by the National Energy Conservation Center and the convention center, will focus on energy conservation, water saving, new energy, recycling and environmental protection.

Meanwhile, support activities such as policy interpretation and enterprise exchanges will be held to promote international cooperation of “green manufacturing.”

IKEA, the Swedish home furnishing brand owned by Ingka Holding, has doubled its exhibition in the equipment area compared with last year.

Stéphan Deville, a department head with Ingka China, said China had enormous potential in conservation and environmental protection. Ingka hopes to talk with all circles about the future of home furnishings, the circular economy and renewable energy.

Yuan Yingming, head of Nachi-Fujikoshi China, a machinery manufacturer with robotics at its core, said as China is ramping up policies to enhance energy conservation and environmental protection and expand imports, it will tap into the reform of China’s manufacturing industry with its expertise in automation and energy conservation.

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