Chinese mainland's policy toward Taiwan unchanged after island's elections: spokesperson

Xinhua
The Chinese mainland's policy toward Taiwan remains unchanged in the wake of the island's recent elections, a spokesperson said Wednesday.
Xinhua

The Chinese mainland's policy toward Taiwan remains unchanged in the wake of the island's recent elections, a spokesperson said Wednesday.

"The elections will not change the fact that Taiwan is part of China," said Ma Xiaoguang, spokesman for the State Council Taiwan Affairs Office, at a news briefing.

Ma made the remarks in response to questions about the impact of the Democratic Progressive Party's continued administration and Tsai Ing-wen's re-election on cross-Strait relations and the mainland's Taiwan policy.

"We will continue to uphold the basic principles of 'peaceful reunification' and 'one country, two systems,' and adhere to the one-China principle," said Ma.

The mainland will also continue to unite Taiwan compatriots to promote the peaceful development of cross-Strait relations and advance the process toward the peaceful reunification of the motherland, said Ma.

By adhering to the 1992 Consensus, which embodies the one-China principle, cross-Strait relations will be improved and developed, and the interests and well-being of Taiwan compatriots will be safeguarded and enhanced, Ma said.

He stressed that the mainland is willing to create broad space for peaceful reunification, but will never leave any space for any form of separatist attempts for "Taiwan independence."

"We will never allow anyone, any organization, or any political party, at any time or in any form, to separate any part of Chinese territory from China," Ma said.

 One or two elections in Taiwan will not determine the direction and future of an issue forever, said Ma.

Over the past 40 years, the cross-Strait relations have continued to move forward amid difficulties and twists and turns. "We are confident in our ability to overcome any difficulties and challenges we encounter," Ma added.  

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