The perils, struggles and rewards of studying abroad

An expert from Wall Street English gives advices summed up into "Studying Abroad's Three Musts"

Every year the Yangtze River Delta region sees more than 100,000 students go abroad to study. It is a life-changing decision for all of the family, but also a journey where dreams can come true for the students involved. Yet not all dreams come true and the life of a student abroad is often fraught with difficulties. And that is why events presented by The Wall Street English are worth its weight in gold.

The Wall Street English hosted an event earlier this month, at their Super Brand Mall center, for Yangtze River Delta students to share in their experiences of studying abroad. The event invited domestic educators and experts, who hold authority in the field of education. The purpose of the event was to answer questions from students and their parents about studying abroad and its complications.

Wei Liqing, chief journal editor of the Chinese International Education Association, addressed how he believes that during this time of China’s ascendancy, the nation still lacks professional international talent. To back up his statement he drew on when the United Nations allotted China with 136 professional working positions but they were only able to fill 74 of the positions. Wei also believes China’s domestic educational resources are unable to develop talented professionals and the only way to resolve this issue is through studying abroad to develop their skills.

Xiao Yan, director with the Chinese Privately Run Education Association Professional Training Committee, also spoke of her personal experiences with her own daughter. Xiao gave advice to students’ heads of household how to prepare children for their forthcoming journey. She wrote a book on it called, “Studying Abroad’s Ten Questions: Conversation between A Mother and An Education Advisor,” which is a guide and instruction manual for students studying abroad and their parents.

“Foreign schools may not have a home-room teacher. Prepare but do not over prepare,” said Xiao. “When preparing one’s children’s concepts and thought process on going abroad, be sure to instill in them independence, management of oneself, and a vigorous habit of communication. This will give your children an ability to more quickly adapt to studying abroad.

Wei Liqing, chief journal editor of the Chinese International Education Association, delivered a speech.

The conference suggested there are three musts that need to be fulfilled for parents, guardians and students: finances, test scores and language and cultural ability.

Number one, a student’s tuition fees will be 300,000 yuan (US$45,253) each year, which translates into 1,200,000 yuan over four years of study.

Number two, test scores must not just include IELTS but also TOEFL, SAT test scores and regular school grades. If applying for a major that already has an early program, enroll in more courses related to this major and put in the time and energy to earn a better transcript.

Number three, many students struggle understanding classes and the lack of friends outside of the class. Passing the IELTS and TOEFL skills tests does not guarantee anything. This is because, while in China, students “study foreign language,” while after going abroad they “use the foreign language to study life,” the difference between the two is very large. So language and cultural preparation are a must if one plans on going abroad.

As more and more Chinese students study abroad, Wall Street English has been devoted to helping students break the communication barrier, allowing them to study a new language while absorbing the culture. This allows them to use and employ these skills within society, business, science and other spheres, while improving their soft occupational skills.

Xiao Yan, director with the Chinese Privately Run Education Association Professional Training Committee, autographs her new book.


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