Nature's way in a Tiny Tent

Shanghai real estate firm to establish school in neighboring Zhejiang Province to emphasize the ecological environment, education and rural revitalization. 
Nature's way in a Tiny Tent

Shanghai Aijia Group CEO Li Yanyi with children dancers

A Tiny Tent Nature School, which aims to teach children to befriend the Earth, plants and animals, is to be established in Anji, Zhejiang Province, by the end of the year. 

The establishment of the school is part of the rebranding efforts of Shanghai Aijia Group, a leading Shanghai real estate company, to put more emphasis on the ecological environment, education and rural revitalization, said CEO Li Yanyi.

“China is entering its rapidly developing urbanization process. The nature school launched by Aijia will offer both children and adults an opportunity to have a close relationship with nature. Aesthetic education matters in the growth of children, and I think it is not only a project, but a course,” film director Jia Zhangke said at Aijia's brand launch over the weekend.

Founded in 1982, Aijia is aiming to become “an everyday life aesthetics service provider.”

In response to the central government's call to develop the rural economy, Aijia signed an agreement with the Anji government in January to jointly launch a “White Tea Town.” According to the agreement, Aijia is going to cultivate rural tourism in Xilong Village by developing its white tea industry and its agriculture, education, health and senior care services. The total investment will amount to 6 billion yuan (US$893 million).

The first Tiny Tent Day Care Center will open by the end of this month in Shanghai's Hongkou District, and a community aesthetic education center will be set up in Qingpu District in May, according to Li. 

The brand launch ceremony featured an avant-garde performance directed by choreographer Guo Zhenrong.


Nature's way in a Tiny Tent

Shanghai Aijia Group CEO Li Yanyi 

Nature's way in a Tiny Tent

Film director Jia Zhangke at Aijia's brand launch event

Special Reports
Top