China's 'James Bond' in the ugliness of ivory

Huang Hongxiang, a Chinese investigator in the film, has long risked his life to save and protect wild animals. He will deliver a lecture, "I'm protecting wild animals in Africa."
Imaginechina

Elephants are hunted for being ivory or considered pests.

In April 2016, over 100 tons of ivory was destroyed by the Kenya Wildlife Service. “The Ivory Game,” a documentary starring Leonardo DeCaprio, details the slaughter of African elephants to feed the insatiable ivory trade.

Huang Hongxiang, a Chinese investigator in the film, has long risked his life to save and protect wild animals. Dubbed the “Chinese James Bond,” he sometimes impersonates an ivory merchant in dealing with poachers.

On November 5, he will deliver a lecture, “I’m protecting wild animals in Africa,” in which he will share his story of working with and for animals after graduating from Columbia University.

“The Ivory Game” not only discloses the dark ivory trade but also highlights the underworld of elephant poaching. About 35,000 elephants are killed a year — about one every 15 minutes. Rangers are also killed in clashes with poachers.

As a member of the Wildlife Conservation Society, Huang will share his experience working for sustainable development in Africa and his observations on conservation in China. Academic Ai Ziqi will also present case studies of Chinese wildlife activists in Africa.


Date: November 5, 1:30-3:30pm

Venue: Haishang Culture Center

Address: 1222 Pingxingguan Rd

平型关路1222号



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