Ancient Chinese art to go under the hammer

A cluster of ancient Chinese ink-wash paintings, calligraphy, seals, porcelain and contemporary pieces will go under the hammer at the Shanghai Exhibition Center on April 30.

A cluster of ancient Chinese ink-wash paintings, calligraphy, seals, porcelain and contemporary pieces will go under the hammer at the Shanghai Exhibition Center on April 30.

The 2018 Shanghai Council Spring Auction is divided into several sections, including some ancient Chinese masterpieces.

The highlight will be a 1943 painting by Qi Baishi (1864-1957), titled “Prosperity Lasts Forever.” It is estimated to sell for about 6-8 million yuan (US$0.95-1.26 million).

Qi is widely considered as one of the greatest Chinese painters of the 20th century. His paintings epitomize Chinese tradition using innovative form and style.

Although Qi’s art was inspired by nature, which often depicted animals, insects and flowers, he painted in a unique style.

Qi once said: “The excellence of a painting lies in its being alike, yet unlike. Too much likeness flatters vulgar taste, while too much unlikeness deceives the world.”

Another highlight is a piece called “Waterfall in Tianchi” created by one of the masters of modern Chinese art, Fu Baoshi (1904-65), in 1961.

The daunting work was seen as one of his representative works during his later years.

Hailing from Xinyu, Jiangxi Province, Fu went to Japan to study the history of Oriental art at the Tokyo School of Fine Arts in 1933. He then brought Japanese visual elements to Chinese ink-wash painting techniques. 

Fu was noted for creating an old, elegant style through his integration of poetic atmosphere and painting techniques.

Event details

Date: April 28-29, 10am-6pm (preview); April 30, 9am (auction)
Venue: No. 2 West Hall, Shanghai Exhibition Center
Address: 1000 Yan’an Rd M.

Ti Gong

"Prosperity Lasts Forever" (1943) by Qi Baishi

Ti Gong

"Waterfall in Tianchi" (1961) by Fu Baoshi

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