Chic adds to colonial grandeur

Downtown Mexico is a classic example of how a 17th century’s colonial grandeur can blend perfectly with a raw industrial edge and modern chic.
Courtesy of Design Hotels

The pubic lounge on the second floor is where guests gather for food, drinks and social activities. Seating areas are comfortably furnished with custom pieces.

Downtown Mexico is a classic example of how a 17th century’s colonial grandeur can blend perfectly with a raw industrial edge and modern chic.

Situated in Centro Historico, the historic building itself is a masterpiece. It is known as the “Palacio de los Condes de Miravalle” (Palace of the Countess of Miravalle). She used to be the wealthiest woman in colonial Mexico and her domain extended all the way to the former capital of Nueva Espa?a.

Grupo Habita painstakingly remodeled the colonial building that maintains the Mexican viceregal style. It used to be the palace next to the other colonial landmarks on the cobbled streets of the UNESCO World Heritage site. 

“Since it’s a listed building, no walls can be built and no demolition can be done here. Therefore, the red brick partitions serve as privacy and also as innovative decoration in the interiors. The rooms are sparse but comfortable and practical,” said Rafael Micha Smeke, managing partner at Grupo Habita.

The red volcanic rock of the walls, the wooden beams, vaulted ceilings and handmade clay floor tiles lend a dramatic sense of history to this delightful residence. The interior guest spaces, from the entrance, to the second-level lounge, to the rooms, feature a rare sparsity and character that most modern structure lacks these days. 

All the historic elements have been well-kept at Downtown Mexico and Cherem Serrano Architects used a monochromatic palette mixed with red brick walls. Characteristics such as ornate detailing around the windows of the fa?ade and a stone-forge staircase with intricate handrails sit alongside grey volcanic rock walls and handmade cement tiles.

Most of the furniture pieces are made of pinewood resembling Luis Barragan designs and inspiration.

Barragan is Mexico’s only Pritzker award-winning architect. 

The hotel was opened in 2012 after extensive restoration. The original building was remodeled in the early 1900 when the two arms staircase was also added. In 1945, the mural The Holocaust was painted by Mexican muralist Manuel Rodriguez Lozano. 

The mural now offers a sensational backdrop at Downtown Mexico. Guests walking up the staircases and passing by the mural, will have an unexpected link to Mexico City’s past. The space tells the story of the city’s history.

The pubic lounge on the second floor is where guests gather for food, drinks and social activities. Seating areas are comfortably furnished with custom pieces.

The 17 rooms and suites are designed with a raw industrial vibe, possessing a stripped-back, bohemian-chic elegance. They range from the simple and unadorned, decorated with little more than grey walls and tiled floors, to the stylish, exposed concrete walls and vaulted high brick ceilings. 

Street-side rooms have balconies to take in views of the historic street while the others look over the lush and perfectly manicured patio.

Another highlight is the rooftop terrace — imposingly historic view with an ultra-chic terrace design. It features a bar, lounge area, swimming pool and more, all with a sweeping view of the old colonial spires, domes and steeples.

Grupo Habita’s idea was to create a 21st century neighborhood at Downtown Mexico and the shops around the hotel showcase genuine Mexican offerings, including Remigio, Pineda Covalin, and Paola de la Rosa’s socially responsible designs.

Courtesy of Design Hotels

Street-side rooms have balconies to take in views of the historic street.


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