Jiading company at leading edge in progressing single cell analysis

Shanghai Hesen Biological Technology Co Ltd in ShineLand, Jiading, is making progress with single cell analysis, an application of precision medicine.


Shanghai Hesen Biological Technology Co Ltd in ShineLand, Jiading, is making progress with single cell analysis, an application of precision medicine.

Based on individualized medicine, precision medicine is the latest medical concept method that grows along with genome sequencing technology and is involved with biological information and other medical fields.

Single cell study has been heating up for several years. Labs at Hesen target research single cell selection and analysis.

“We use these technologies to learn about cancer cells, in the hope to find treatment in the earlier stage and provide data for later intervention,” said Luo Yanjun, a researcher at the company.

Cell study in the past usually looked into a group of cells as the research object, for example, looking into cells for different races of people in the same time.

The single cell study, however, is able to study one race’s cell features, which means the characteristics of individual cells can be captured to tell precisely the minor changes going on in the process.

Hesen’s devices are doing their part to promote the progress. Its independently developed sifting machine can effectively avoid the abuse of antibiotics and increase the chances for a patient to survive.

According to statistics from World Health Organization, each year more than 700,000 people die from drug resistant organism infections.

Yet the antibiotics market still grows at an annual average of 8 percent, worsening the case for the efficiency of antibiotics use.

“There are so many kinds of antibiotics,” said Luo, “many experiments are needed to make sure the medicine works for the disease.” Hesen’s new testing method is capable of detecting the inhibited antibiotics and their combination in the blood so as to quickly select the corresponding medicine to use.



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