Local scientists one step closer to fountain of youth

Local scientists have found a new molecular pathway responsible for aging, providing a new target for human anti-aging therapy research. 

Local scientists made a significant breakthrough that could bring the elusive fountain of youth a little closer to reality.

They've identified a new molecular pathway responsible for aging, providing a new target for human anti-aging therapy and medication research.

“Aging is a very tough challenge across the world, which has one billion people over 60 years old now, which will rise to 2.1 billion by 2050 and 3.1 billion by 2100,” Cai Shiqing, the research’s chief scientist, said. 

“Our research is to study the relevant genetic mechanism of aging and study how to delay the aging process to allow people to have a healthy aging process and postpone the degeneration of their functions.”

By studying a certain type of ringworm, a model animal for aging research, local scientists found that a new gene, RGBA-1, and its receptor, NPR-28, play an important role in the worm's aging. 

Those with low generation of RGBA-1 and low activity of NPR-28 have a slower aging process than others.

“We also found that we can control their aging process by controlling RGBA-1 and NPR-28,” Cai added. “There is a similar receptor in human beings — our next step is to study the effects of the receptor in mammals’ aging processes.”

The research was published by world leading science journal Nature on Thursday.


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