Young women and non-smokers also at risk of lung cancer: study

Young women and those who don't smoke are also at risk of lung cancer, though the mechanism is still not clear, local experts have announced.

Young women and those who don’t smoke are also at risk of lung cancer, though the mechanism is still not clear, local experts have announced.

A project was carried out by the Shanghai Cancer Center, and went on to win first prize at Shanghai's Science and Technology Award.

Based on big data research, the project carried out large-scale community screenings and set up new diagnosis and treatment standards to reduce patients’ cost and pain.

Experts screened 11,332 residents in seven communities and found the at-risk population for lung cancer also includes young women and those who don’t smoke. It provided important evidence for further, wider coverage and promotion of early lung cancer screening.

“Traditionally, older people, males, and smokers are considered at risk for lung cancer, but our research found young women and non-smokers are also at risk and should receive screening for early detection and treatment,” said Dr Chen Haiquan, chief of the research. 

“About 70 percent of lung cancer patients receiving surgery in our hospital currently are those in the early stage thanks to CT screening, and 76 percent of our lung cancer patients in 2016 were females or non-smokers."

Lung cancer is the cancer with the top incidence and mortality in China. Five-year survival for those in the middle or late stages of lung cancer is less than 30 percent, while it is over 90 percent for those in the early stage.

Chen’s team also set up individualized treatment based on molecular diagnosis to reduce some invasive pre-surgery checks and give more precise diagnoses and treatment. The guideline has been promoted at over ten big hospitals across the nation.

Standardized diagnoses and treatment is the key for recovery and survival, experts said.

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