Shanghai eases restrictions on medical institutions, GPs

Shanghai is lifting restrictions on medical institutions, clinics and general practitioners to boost the development of the health services industry, authorities said yesterday.

In a major development, Shanghai is lifting restrictions on medical institutions, clinics and general practitioners to boost the development of the health services industry, authorities said yesterday.

The local health authority has released an industry guideline that includes policies on medical treatment, health service and insurance.

Restrictions on private enterprises to open medical institutions and clinics will be eased.

“The aim is to welcome high-level international medical brands to set up base here, and we will back them with land, financial, tax and personnel support,” Shanghai Vice Mayor Weng Tiehui said.

The government will also encourage non-government entities to invest and build specialist medical institutes, she said.

Shanghai has 2,240 private medical institutes, including 188 private hospitals, and 763 private clinics. Together, they provide 21,000 beds.

The city has more than 8,200 general practitioners and the target is to have five qualified general practitioners for every 10,000 permanent resident population by 2020.

At the same time, the management of private medical institutes and clinics will be strengthened while violators will have their licenses revoked or operations suspended, said Wu Jinglei, director of Shanghai Health and Family Planning Commission.

A blacklist system will be put in place to fight medical malpractices.

The guideline states that authorities will improve the approval procedure for joint venture medical institutes and explore the establishment of quick approval channels.

Instead of the current 25 percent, high-tech enterprises and leading technology companies will only pay 15 percent income tax under the new guideline.

Efforts to develop new medicines for cancer patients will also be encouraged. 

Prices of 24 high-priced cancer drugs has been slashed and included in the medical insurance, said Zhang Chao, director of the medical insurance department of the Shanghai Human Resources and Social Security Bureau. 


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