Yagi brings rain, cool air but heat relief won't last

Rains that hit Shanghai yesterday – under the influence of Typhoon Yagi – will linger into this week despite the departure of the tropical storm, the local weather authority said.
Wang Rongjiang / SHINE

A man, carrying his child, wades across water after getting off a bus in heavy rain in Shanghai yesterday as Typhoon Yagi neared.

Rains that hit Shanghai early yesterday — under the influence of Typhoon Yagi — will linger into this week despite the departure of the tropical storm, the local weather authority said.

This year’s 14th typhoon, Yagi made landfall in Wenling of neighboring Zhejiang Province last night but it will weaken later and move to the northwest, according to the Shanghai Meteorological Bureau.

Yagi’s influence on the city will end this morning, but humid days will continue. Throughout the week, it will be overcast to cloudy, punctuated by scattered showers and thunderstorms. And the mercury will climb again, with the high temperatures ranging between 33 and 35 degrees Celsius, forecasters said.

Yagi brought short relief from the lasting heatwave. After seven consecutive high-temperature days, marked by highs hitting 35 degrees or more, the city’s downtown Xujiahui weather station only recorded 28.5 degrees at 10am yesterday. As heavy rains pummeled the city, the mercury dropped further to 25.9 degrees at 4pm.

At 9:45am yesterday, the city was put on yellow alert for lightning and rainstorm, the second level of the four-color warning system for both, and a blue alert for typhoon, the lowest level of the warning system.

As the typhoon moved inward, the city was deluged, especially its eastern areas. By 5pm, downtown Xujiahui had recorded accumulated rainfall of 45.5 millimeters; Chongming Island’s Xianghua Town — the most badly hit area — saw 111.7mm of precipitation; followed by Datuan Town of the Pudong New Area that had 111.5mm of rain.

The water level in the Huangpu River and at Hangzhou Bay was quite high since midnight following the downpour and gale.

At 10:32am, Shanghai’s flood prevention information office issued a blue alert for high tide on the Huangpu, amid forecast that the river’s water level will exceed 4.55 meters in 12 hours. 

At the outfall of Suzhou Creek, where it enters the Huangpu, the water level exceeded the danger level yesterday afternoon and it is forecast to rise to 4.9m at 2:10am today.

To ensure safety of people living in coastal areas, more than 4,000 people have been evacuated, mostly on Chongming Island, according to the city’s flood prevention headquarters. 

A total of 1,929 ships have dropped anchor while 5,096 people on board these vessels have been given shelter ashore.

The deluge also led to disruption elsewhere.

According to the city’s greenery authority, 20 parks were closed.

Some 100 trains were suspended and nearly 300 flights were canceled at Pudong and Hongqiao international airports yesterday.

A total of 149 flights had been canceled at Pudong airport as of 5pm, while another 143 were canceled at Hongqiao airport, the Shanghai Airport Authority said.

Despite the cancelations, weather conditions in general around both airports were mild with scanty rainfall. As a result, more than 600 flights took off from both airports yesterday, with 500-plus flights landing.

The air traffic controller also issued the second-level orange alert for flight delays for both airports and said their takeoff and landing capacity was reduced by half through 6pm.


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