Office workers put good health in back seat

More than 97 percent of local white-collar workers were found to have health problems during checkups last year, according to a report released yesterday.

More than 97 percent of local white-collar workers were found to have health problems during checkups last year, according to a report released yesterday.

The figure is up from 94 percent in 2013.

The report, by Shanghai Foreign Service (Group) Co and the “Popular Medicine” magazine, was based on the health records of 350,000 office workers in the city.

The report shows that excess weight, fatty livers, external hemorrhoids, high blood uric acid and thyroid nodules were the top five problems.

About 36.9 percent of workers were found to have excess weight, up from 22.1 percent in 2013.

Excess weight was not only the most commonly found problem, but also the second fastest in growth, with a rise of 14.8 percentage points. Thyroid abnormalities were found among 28.3 percent of the employees, an increase of 18.7 percentage points.

Excess weight was more frequently seen in male workers than female. The report showed that 55.1 percent of male office workers had weight issues compared to 21.6 percent of females.

The top five risks for male employees were excess weight, fatty livers, hyperlipidemia, high blood uric and high blood viscosity, while the highest risks for female workers were breast lobular hyperplasia, external hemorrhoids, gynecological inflammation, excess weight and fatty livers.

Breast lobular hyperplasia was found among 71 percent of women.

Fan Zhuping, a professor at the health care center of Renji Hospital, said the abnormalities found among white-collar workers were mainly caused by a rich diet and a lack of physical exercise.

The report also showed that although the rate of workers who paid attention to health had grown to 85 percent, they lacked scientific health management practices.

Half of the workers said they failed to do physical exercise regularly, more than 40 percent said they stayed up late, 38.9 percent drank sugary beverages and 30 percent ate junk food.

About 71.8 percent of those surveyed also complained of excessive work hours.

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