Archives tell Party's story

A wealth of material about the history and development of the Communist Party of China has gone on display in Shanghai to mark the 98th anniversary of the CPC.
Archives tell Party's story
Yang Jian / SHINE

Visitors examine the wealth of material on display at an exhibition at Shanghai Archives on Monday about the Communist Party of China.

Shanghai Archives put on display a wealth of material about the history and development of the Communist Party of China on Monday, marking the 98th anniversary of the CPC.

Most of the exhibits are from China's national archives and on show in the city for the first time. They include a collection of early newspapers and Party publications as well as photographs, leaflets, manuscripts and videos.

The archive material records how the CPC has led the Chinese people in revolution, development and reform. The exhibition aims to highlight the discipline and spirit of the Party, according to the city archives.

Precious exhibits that are on show for the first time include the handwritten inscriptions by Chairman Mao Zedong of his inspiring remark that "a single spark can start a prairie fire" and his famous poem "Long March" written in October 1935 when the two-year campaign was about to succeed.

The manuscript of then Premier Zhou Enlai is also on display. He wrote an inscription for the Monument to the People's Heroes in Beijing in September 1949. It is said the premier spared a lot of time from his busy schedule to practice calligraphy.

Archives tell Party's story
Yang Jian / SHINE

A visitor takes a photograph of a manuscript on display at Shanghai Archives on Monday.

Two pages of desk calendars used by the premier in 1955 are exhibited. He wrote a long list of work arrangements and appointments on them. On September 23, for instance, he worked to 2am.

The writings of early Party members and reformists, including Deng Xiaoping, Liu Shaoqi, Chen Yun and Ren Bishi, are among the exhibition highlights.

Photographs taken during the trial of corrupt former Party members Liu Qingshan and Zhang Zishan, who were sentenced to death in 1952, can be seen by visitors. 

Visitors can also listen to the opening remarks made by Chairman Mao at the first National People's Congress on September 15, 1954. A photograph of People's Liberation Army soldiers lying on the ground to avoid disturbing local citizens after entering Shanghai on May 27, 1949, are also on display.

The exhibition on the fourth floor of the Shanghai Archives at 9 Zhongshan Road E2 is open to the public free from 9am to 5pm daily, except Sundays.

Archives tell Party's story
Yang Jian / SHINE

Visitors use their mobile phones to record some of the material on display that tells the history and development of the Communist Party of China.

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