The right way to see left-handed people ...

Xinhua
It is estimated that one in every 10 people is left-handed, which means at least 130 million lefties in China. Yet for a long time, being left-handed was deemed “wrong.”
Xinhua

“We’re living in a world for right-handers,” said Lin Pan. “The shutter on the camera is on the right, the mouse of the computer, the accelerator of a vehicle, as well as the design of scissors — these are mostly based on the habits of right handers.”

Lin started a website, “Left-Handed China,” in 2013 to speak for his fellow “lefties.” It posts articles and research and collects complaints from left-handed people.

The site has more than 28,000 registered members and organizes events every August 13 for International Left-Handers Day.

“By setting up the website, I wanted to clear up the misunderstandings about left-handers,” Lin said.

For a long time, being left-handed was deemed “wrong” in parts of China.

“My teacher used to try to force me into using my right hand, and until now, I often feel nervous when I deal with changes in my life,” Lin said.

Even today, he receives calls from parents concerned about their children’s “unusual” habits.

“They call me up and say their children have experienced a lot of inconvenience at school, and I persuade them to give up the idea of correcting their children’s left-handed habits,” he said.

It is estimated that one in every 10 people is left-handed, which means at least 130 million lefties in China.

“I am very regretful that I forcibly corrected my son’s left-handedness,” Han Yamei said. 

“I found my son using his left hand to eat, hold items and draw when he was 3 years old, so I always put the pen in his right hand when he practiced writing,” she said. 

“It took him a year to change the habit. I did this because I didn’t want him to be bullied at school, but now I believe it is better to let it be.”

Most people no longer view left-handedness as abnormal, and parents are taught they should not intervene.

“In many developed countries, the kindergarten teachers ask the children about their handedness and offer proper assistance,” Li said. “They also have textbooks instructing the children how to hold a pen with their left hand. We still have much room to improve in China.”  


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