Children dislike 'over-sharenting'

Xinhua
Children are increasingly concerned that their images and information are being shared on their parents' social media.
Xinhua

Children are increasingly concerned that their images and information are being shared on their parents’ social media.

“If my face is frequently exposed on my parents’ social media, such as WeChat Moments, it might not be safe for me,” 10-year-old Zhang Chuyi wrote to a congress of the Young Pioneers of China in Shanghai.

Zhang is a fourth-grade student in a Shanghai elementary school. In her class of more than 30 students, more than 70 percent said their parents had shared things about them in a variety of ways. Most of the children did not like their images or information being shared online.

Zhang first began to oppose “over-sharenting” when she found out that her parents had been sharing her photos and assignments online without her consent.

She said she felt really embarrassed and stressed.

Zhang’s classmates agreed.

“These days, faces can be used in many ways because of facial recognition,” they said.

Zhou Jianjun, an official in charge of children’s rights protection in Shanghai, said: “It should be noted that most Chinese children nowadays are born around 2010. Born and living in a digital era, children are very familiar with the Internet. In fact, their consciousness of online privacy is even stronger than most adults.”

In order to better ensure children’s security, the Chinese government has been taking measures to strengthen children’s protection online and is also trying to enhance children’s awareness of online privacy by promoting security education.

“This is partly the reason behind the awakening of children’s online privacy consciousness and self-protection consciousness,” Zhou said.

Zhang proposal caused quite a stir online.

“But my child is so wonderful that I cannot help myself,” said a woman surnamed Zheng.

Online user “Liudianshui” said: “It is important to obtain children’s permission.”

Zhang said: “We need to consider their feelings. Though we are not grown-ups, our rights still need to be respected. We are our own masters.”

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