Chinese lawmakers consider tougher punishment for identity theft in school, college admissions

Xinhua
Tougher penalties for those who steal the identities of others to enroll in a school or college were highlighted in the latest draft revision to the Education Law.
Xinhua

Tougher penalties for those who steal the identities of others to enroll in a school or college were highlighted in the latest draft revision to the Education Law, which is under consideration of the Chinese lawmakers.

The draft amendment to the country's Education Law was presented to lawmakers on Monday for a second reading at the ongoing session of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress .

Holders of public office who organize identity theft, fraudulently use others' identities and take others' places in admission, or instigating others to do so, will be given sanctions in accordance with laws, the draft says.

Violators will be prosecuted for criminal liability if the circumstances constitute a crime, it adds.

The period of the ban for those imposters on participating in relevant national examinations will be extended to two to five years from the previous period of one to three years, according to the draft.

Lawmakers are expected to deliberate the draft amendment in group discussions during the ongoing session of the NPC Standing Committee, which runs from Monday to Thursday.

China's latest amendment to the Criminal Law, which came into effect on March 1, 2021, stipulates that impostors who steal others' identities to enroll in a university or college shall be sentenced to no more than three years in prison, short-term detention or restriction, and shall also be fined.

China has attached great importance to ensuring fairness in education. The country has pledged to make strides in developing more equitable education, according to this year's government work report.

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