Mosques reopen, domestic flights resume in Saudi Arabia

AP
Tens of thousands of mosques across Saudi Arabia reopened yesterday for the first time in more than two months.
AP

Tens of thousands of mosques across Saudi Arabia reopened yesterday for the first time in more than two months, with worshipers ordered to follow strict guidelines to prevent the spread of the coronavirus as Islam’s holiest site in Mecca remained closed to the public.

The Saudi government prepared for the reopening of around 90,000 mosques after sanitizing prayer rugs, washrooms and shelves holding copies of the Koran.

The Ministry of Islamic Affairs said millions of text messages were sent to people in multiple languages to inform them about the new rules for public prayer, which include keeping a 2-meter distance during prayer, wearing face masks at all times and abstaining from greeting one another with handshakes or hugs.

Children under 15 were not allowed inside mosques. The elderly and those with chronic conditions were being told to pray at home. People are also being advised to perform the mandatory ablution at home since washrooms at mosques will be closed, to use hand sanitizers and to bring their own prayer rugs and copies of the Koran.

The restrictions call for mosques to open just 15 minutes before each of the five daily prayers and to close 10 minutes after they conclude. Friday sermons and prayers are to last no longer than 15 minutes.

Saudi Arabia also lifted a ban on domestic air travel and permitted some public sector workers to resume office work again, though full attendance will not be allowed until mid-June.

The new measures come as Saudi Arabia and other countries around the world begin to loosen restrictions and stay-at-home orders following weeks of curfews and lockdowns.

However, the Grand Mosque in Mecca, which houses the cube-shaped Kaaba that Muslims around the world pray toward, will remain closed to the public.

The city has been under a strict lockdown for several weeks. The mosque in Medina where the Prophet Muhammad is buried will be partially opened to the public to pray outside.

The continued closure of Mecca points to the increasing likelihood that the kingdom may suspend this year’s annual Muslim Hajj pilgrimage in late July. A senior Saudi official has told prospective pilgrims not to plan for the Hajj this year amid the global pandemic.

Despite early and unprecedented measures, Saudi Arabia has recorded more than 83,000 coronavirus cases, and 480 deaths.

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