Washington's tariff decision makes things 'worse, not better': expert

Xinhua
Washington's move to increase additional tariffs on Chinese imports during the just-concluded round of China-US trade talks has made trade tensions "worse, not better."
Xinhua

Washington's move to increase additional tariffs on Chinese imports during the just-concluded round of China-US trade talks has made trade tensions “worse, not better,” an expert on China said Saturday.

Jon Taylor, a political science professor at University of St Thomas in Houston, told Xinhua that ranting about deal-breaking and increasing tariffs “is not a normal negotiation strategy with one of the world’s preeminent powers.”

Washington on Friday increased additional tariffs on US$200 billion worth of Chinese imports from 10 percent to 25 percent, a move Beijing said it deeply regrets and will be forced to respond to with necessary countermeasures.

Taylor said China’s attitude towards the tariff hike meant that China will not tolerate anything less than an equal standing in the negotiations.

In the face of Washington’s move, China has repeatedly stressed that slapping additional tariffs is no solution, and the only way forward is cooperation and consultation based on respect of each other’s core concerns.

“China has demonstrated both restraint and calm” throughout the trade negotiations, Taylor said. 

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