China not interested in "competition of systems," says Chinese senior diplomat

China's success serves as one of alternative options to those proposed by the West, "Yet China is not interested in the so-called 'competition of systems.'"

A bullet train drives in Liuzhou City, south China's Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, July 15, 2017.

China's success serves as one of alternative options to those proposed by the West, "Yet China is not interested in the so-called 'competition of systems,'" Chinese congresswoman and senior diplomat Fu Ying wrote in a signed article to the special edition of German Times for the Munich Security Conference being held from Friday to Sunday.

In the article, Fu Ying, chairperson of the Foreign Affairs Committee of the National People's Congress, said that China has no intention to export its political system and ideology.

The security challenges in today's world are globalized and should be addressed in global cooperative way, she wrote.


The US-led Western world has been attempting to westernize all the globe by exporting its own values and models, according to the Chinese diplomat. Those attempts have not only failed to address old problems but have also created new ones, she said.

China, as part of the world, will only develop well in a peaceful international environment, she said, adding that China reiterated that peace and development remain the call of our day, while admitting that the world faces growing uncertainties and destabilizing factors.

China's diplomatic goals in the new era include promoting the creation of a new type of international relations, with more prominence given to lasting peace, universal security and common prosperity and a call for the building of a community with a shared future of mankind, Fu continued.

"These are not only our expectations for the world's future, but also a necessity for our domestic development," she wrote.


But as China becomes stronger, questions and worries outside of China emerged.

What does it mean when China vows to "move closer to center stage?" Does it mean China is prepared to replace the United States and playing a "leading role?" When China offers "Chinese wisdom and a Chinese approach," is that tantamount to China exporting its development model?

Fu answered to these worries by saying "We wish to play a role in world affairs and make an even greater contribution to mankind. But it must be done within our means and in a manner consistent with our values."

She emphasized that China has only offered a new option to countries that seek rapid development while retaining their independence, "but this does not mean that China's model and ideology are to be exported."


Regarding the security interests of countries, there are differences between the United States plus its alliance and the countries not belonging to any alliance, she said, adding, "It is therefore important that all countries work together to set out some basic common principles."

Fu said, what China is advocating is in response to "the call of the times."

If China and the United States, also Europe, Russia and others as well, can begin exploring the basic principles of major dispute resolution, this will not only help maintain overall stability in relations between the major powers, but will also facilitate the resolution of hot-spot regional issues, according to Fu.