Shanghai hosts first stage of World Cup from today

The 2018 Archery World Cup is being held in Shanghai this week, bringing together more than 500 archers, coaches and officials from 46 countries and regions.

THE 2018 Archery World Cup is being held in Shanghai this week, bringing together more than 500 archers, coaches and officials from 46 countries and regions.

Participants will compete in 10 disciplines, including men’s and women’s recurve and compound, as well as individual, team and mixed team competitions. Qualifying and knockout rounds will be held at Pudong’s Yuanshen Sports Center from today to Friday. They are open to the public for free.

The finals will be held in the Lujiazui area on Saturday and Sunday, with tickets priced from 50 yuan (US$7.9).

This year marks the 10th year that Shanghai is hosting the World Cup, which is also the first stage of this year’s calendar. According to Tom Dielen, secretary general of the World Archery Federation, new rules will be applied, starting from Shanghai, and the winner of each stage — the hosts of the other 3 stages are Antalya, Turkey; Salt Lake City, Utah; and Berlin — will automatically qualify for the World Cup final in Turkey.

“With the 2018 Asian Games approaching, the performance of archers will become a reference for their national teams when they decide on athletes for the Games,” said Dielen.

According to Wang Dawei, vice president of the Chinese Archery Association, the Shanghai stage of this year’s World Cup will be the new Chinese national team’s first international competition.

“We put together a new national team last year. Half of its members are young archers who don’t have much experience. The Shanghai competition will serve as a good warm-up ahead of the Asian Games,” said Wang.

Chinese archers will compete against experienced rivals, including top-ranked recurve athletes Kim Woo-jin and Chang Hye-jin of South Korea.

“China has not been doing very well in international competitions in the past few years. To increase the public’s involvement in the sport, we will set up more competitions and form new clubs,” added Wang.

Wang’s thoughts were echoed by Dielen. “We hope China will involve more young population in the sport. Traditional sports like archery are finding it more difficult to attract young people amid the pull of new sports.”


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