Europe criticizes Iran for breaking N-pact

Reuters
European powers took their first step yesterday toward punishing Iran for breaking its nuclear agreement, triggering the deal's mechanism to resolve breaches.
Reuters
Europe criticizes Iran for breaking N-pact
AFP

German Chancellor Merkel welcomes Ali Akbar Dabiran, Iran's representative to Germany, during a reception of the diplomatic corps at the German governmental guest house in Meseberg, northeastern Germany on July 9, 2019. 

European powers took their first step yesterday toward punishing Iran for breaking its nuclear agreement, triggering the deal’s mechanism to resolve breaches.

The foreign ministers of Britain, France and Germany, plus the foreign affairs chief of the European Union, said in a statement that Iran was “pursuing activities inconsistent with its commitments” under the deal, known as the JCPOA.

“These compliance issues must be addressed within the framework of the JCPOA, and a Joint Commission should be convened urgently,” they said.

The three European powers are the remaining Western signatories to Iran’s 2015 nuclear agreement, which was abandoned by the United States last year.

Convening a joint commission of signatories — the Europeans plus Russia and China — is the first step in a process foreseen in the agreement that could eventually lead to a “snapback,” bringing back the international sanctions lifted by the deal.

“Iran has stated that it wants to remain within the JCPOA. It must act accordingly by reversing these activities and returning to full JCPOA compliance without delay,” the European countries said.

The 2015 agreement between Iran and world powers offered Iran access to world trade in return for agreeing to curbs on its nuclear program.

The future of the pact has been in doubt since last year when the United States pulled out of it and reimposed unilateral sanctions. Iran has said it wants to continue to abide by the agreement but cannot do so indefinitely if US sanctions prevent it from receiving any of the promised economic benefits.

The deal’s fate has come to a head in the past 10 days, after Iran announced steps that were in violation of its central commitments — it announced that it had amassed more enriched uranium than allowed under the agreement and said it had refined uranium to a higher purity.

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