Making megacities more livable and sustainable

Peng Yinghong will join the discussion "Sustainable environmental technologies to create sustainable, resilient and livable cities of the future" at the Pujiang Innovation Forum.

Professor Peng Yinghong is the director of Institute of Mechatronic Design and Knowledge-based Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University. He is also the program director of Energy and Environmental Sustainability for Megacities, a major collaboration between Shanghai Jiao Tong University and National University of Singapore.

His research areas include knowledge-based engineering, plastic forming theory and simulation technology, machine learning and mechatronics design.

He will join the forum discussion “Sustainable environmental technologies to create sustainable, resilient and livable cities of the future” at the Pujiang Innovation Forum.

Making megacities more livable and sustainable
Ti Gong

Peng Yinghong is director of Institute of Mechatronic Design and Knowledge-based Engineering, SJTU

Q: What’s your understanding of the theme “New Vision and New Future of Science and Technology Innovation?”

A: I think that the new vision and new future of science and technology innovation should include three attributes: efficiency, creativity, and knowledge fusion.

Q: Your panel will focus on the topic of constructing a sustainable future, what’s your view? And how do you define a sustainable future?

A: The topic of constructing a sustainable future is a key development strategy for megacities like Shanghai. Megacities face complicated problems. Sustainability is actually a systemic level conception and it is difficult to evaluate sustainability on its own.

The sustainable future of a megacity will focus on the coordination between different parts in the systems. This includes seeking a coordinated development strategy of sub-systems including population, economy, society, resource and environment.

Q: Can you give us a brief introduction of the E2S2 program?

A: Energy and Environmental Sustainability Solutions for Megacities (E2S2) is a research program supported by the Campus for Research Excellence and Technological Enterprise under the National Research Foundation of Singapore. E2S2-CREATE is a major collaborative program between Shanghai Jiao Tong University and the National University of Singapore on the theme of sustainable solutions for problems targeted at stressed megacities.

We have developed a number of sustainable solutions for problems in the field of waste management and emerging contaminants for Singapore, other stressed megacities in Asia and around the world.  These solutions are used in the areas of strategic policymaking and near real-time environmental monitoring and response. It is achieving its committed key performance indices ahead of time, and also meeting specific milestones with environmental sensing and waste treatment technologies being adopted.

Q: In your opinion, what are major stresses for megacities? And what are the possible solutions?

A: The major stresses for megacities are the increase in population size, environmental deterioration, resource shortage, public health and aging. The possible solutions include optimizing urban planning, encouraging technological and management innovation and enforcing environmental law.

Q: How do you evaluate Singapore’s urban management? What can we learn from Singapore?

A: Singapore’s urban management system is one of best models in the world. Particularly, the prospective urban planning and the elaborative urban governance are areas we should learn from Singapore.

Q: Can you give some advice for further cooperation with Singapore on urban management?

A: The collaboration between Shanghai and Singapore has a long history and is highly successful. Both cities face a number of similar challenges for future development.

For further collaboration with Singapore, I would like to suggest that both cities extend collaborative fields and explore new collaboration mechanisms.

Both cities may establish a collaboration platform to enhance economy, trade, and science and technology innovation collaborations. In particular, both cities may co-fund synergic research on sustainable development problems. 

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