Host of events mark International Museum Day

Traditional clothes and fine arts were disaplyed.

Jiang Xiaowei / SHINE

A parade of traditional Chinese clothing is staged to promote the nation’s history and culture in the Fengshengli commercial complex in the district. 

Jiang Xiaowei / SHINE

Jing’an’s museums, memorials and art galleries hosted a wide range of activities from May 18-20 in the Fengshengli commercial complex to mark International Museum Day that fell on May 18.

Shanghai Hanweiyang Traditional Cultural Promotion Center, founded in 2005 to promote traditional Chinese dress, organized a parade of people wearing Han clothes and held talks about the culture of Han clothes.

Companion Art House, a memorial to the century-old “The Young Companion” magazine, displayed old magazines and sold 100 newly printed copyrights of the first issue of the magazine.

Masters of the famous Lu’an inkpad technique made seals and showed how the old art is done. The Lu’an inkpad was invented by pharmacist Zhang Lu’an at the end of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911). The pad is made of oil, cinnabar and processed mugwort grass.

“It’s interesting, and it’s full of cultural significance,” said Ashely Lambert from New Zealand. “It made me stop and look. I think it’s good to see Chinese culture in an open venue.

Jing’an has more than 60 museums, including Communist Party of China memorials, heritage galleries and privately run museums covering a range of collections.

The district’s cultural officials have designed a bike trek linking 29 museums, including the Shanghai Mylnikov Art Museum, former residence of educator Cai Yuanpei, and the privately owned Zhu Zhenyu Folding Fan Gallery.

According to officials, Jing’an wants to turn the whole district into a huge living museum. That’s a departure from traditional museums built to showcase specific collections.

Indeed, the people, buildings and activities of Jing’an all have stories to tell, creating a museum without borders, officials explained.

So far, 20 sites in Jing’an, including the historical Paramount ballroom, the iconic Starbuck’s Roastery and the weekend destination Daning Park, have QR codes printed on their entrances, allowing visitors to use their smartphones to read and hear stories behind the venues. 



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