Classic comedies of pioneering dramatist newly interpreted by local students

Xu Wei
Three comedies by renowned Chinese playwright Ding Xilin (1893-1974) have been reinterpreted and staged by local students from the acting department of Shanghai Lida University.
Xu Wei
SSI ļʱ
Classic comedies of pioneering dramatist newly interpreted by local students

Students from the acting department of Shanghai Lida University perform comedies written by famous Chinese playwright Ding Xilin.

Three classic comedies by renowned Chinese playwright Ding Xilin (1893-1974) have been newly interpreted and staged by local students from the acting department of Shanghai Lida University as graduation pieces.

The three dramas written by Ding — "A Wasp," "Blind in One Eye," and "Three Dollars in National Currency" — were presented at the Yexie Theater from Monday (November 13) through Wednesday.

Ding is remembered as the author of a lot of popular one-act plays of the 1920s and 1930s. He was a student of physics and mathematics at the University of Birmingham, but also showed great interest in literature and Western drama.

Ding's creations mainly concentrated on comedy. He was adept at using delicate and analytical writing techniques, and humorous and witty language to portray various comedic, contradictory, and implicit relationships between characters.

During the pioneering period of Chinese drama, both Ding and dramatist Tian Han made great contributions to modern Chinese theater with their powerful and expressive works.

Classic comedies of pioneering dramatist newly interpreted by local students

The plays provide insights into the emotions and lifestyles of people in the 1920s.

The three comedies mainly reflected people's views on love and marriage in the 1920s. The romantic comedy "A Wasp" is a satire of social taboos at that time that prohibited young people from free love.

"Blind in One Eye" is a farce about a couple's reflections on their marriage while "Three Dollars in National Currency" depicts the turmoil and insecurity that war brought to people's hearts and lives.

Officials from Shanghai Lida University said that the three performances by acting department students paid homage to Ding's original works and traditional culture. The plays also offered insights into the lifestyles of people in the 1920s.

According to Zhao Qian, a teacher from the acting department, the art market of the future requires versatile talent. These performances aim not only to enhance students' acting skills, but also to improve their teamwork and innovation abilities.

Classic comedies of pioneering dramatist newly interpreted by local students
SSI ļʱ
Special Reports

Top