Shanghai pushes for national personal credit law

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Shanghai's deputies to the first session of the 13th National People's Congress have proposed a national credit law to improve the country's personal credit system.
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Shanghai’s deputies to the first session of the 13th National People’s Congress have proposed a national credit law to improve the country’s personal credit system.

A proposal by Chen Li, an NPC deputy and general manager of China Mobile’s Shanghai branch, said that although China has made great progress in tightening credit controls, the system has not kept up with economic and social development.

Problems include a lack of credit records, rewards for honest people, and proper punishment for defaulters.

“The construction of the credit system is a long-term systematic project requiring strong innovation covering various fields of the economy and society,” Chen said. “So far our country doesn’t have a national law.”

Chen suggested even minor offenses such as evading Metro fares should be recorded on a person’s credit record, saying that would be more effective than issuing a fine.

Last year, Hubei, Hebei and Zhejiang provinces and Shanghai set up their own credit regulations, indicating the need for a legal framework for credit, the proposal states.

Chen suggested that the law should set out clear guidelines for credit, the collection of personal information, and punishments and rewards.

It could also include a blacklist for people who commit serious violations and the development of credit service industries.

Zhang Zhao’an, vice president of the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences and an NPC deputy, told Shanghai Daily that improving the credit system was vital to national development.

“With the improvement of our market economy system, the credit system should also be continually improved,” Zhang said.

“A law would help the development of the credit system.”

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