New steps to speed service reforms

Jing'an is expected to be a vital part of the global services provider network by providing strong support in help with introducing overseas institutions.

Jing'an District, which was appointed the city’s district to pioneer services reform in 2010, has been given a list of 26 suggestions by the Shanghai government to help achieve the goal.

They include simplifying administrative procedures, introducing incentives to attract talent and tapping into historical preservation and reuse.

Jing’an is being urged to step up its efforts as part of the city government’s ongoing campaign to promote Shanghai’s manufacturing, services, shopping and culture.

By 2020, it is envisaged that the district’s annual increase in the added value of the services industry will remain higher than 7 percent, with tax revenue from the sector accounting for 95 percent or more of the total. There will also be 80 regional headquarters in Jing’an by then, according to the city’s plan.

Jing’an compares itself to world-class regions famed for great services, and thus it will improve its ability to allocate global resources, from capital to technology, and from information to talent, according to Xu Xingli, deputy director of Jing’an Development and Reform Commission.

“Jing’an is expected to be a vital part of the global services provider network by providing strong support in help with introducing overseas institutions and exporting local companies,” she said.

The Globalization and World Cities Research Network, a think tank based at the UK’s Loughborough University, ranked Shanghai ninth in its advanced producer services ranking last year, noting its strong advantages and influence in the sector.

A number of achievements have been made over the eight years since the services project began in Jing’an.

The district became the first in the city to establish a professional human resources services industrial park, aiming to provide talent for Shanghai and the Yangtze Delta area.

It also cooperated with Customs to grant priority to nearly 20 labels, including luxury brand Gucci and high-street brand Zara, reducing the chances of shipments being held up for inspection.


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