Cranes go to leave a smoother waterway

Navigation channels of the Huangpu River in Songjiang District are smoother with cleaner water and the riverbank scenery more charming.

Navigation channels of the Huangpu River in Songjiang District are smoother with cleaner water and the riverbank scenery more charming since the district’s shipping management bureau rid the channels of floating cranes two years ago.

The cranes were used to transfer cargo from large vessels to small boats heading for narrower waterways. The floating crane industry flourished because of increasing demand for sand with the rapid growth of the city’s infrastructure.

Before it rid its channels of floating cranes in 2017, Songjiang had a third of the city’s total due to its long waterways.

“Floating cranes affect shipping safety. The number of accidents increased yearly at the floating crane operation zones and each year there were serious accidents in which boats sank and people died,” said a Songjiang shipping management bureau official. “In addition, water got contaminated when there were accidents caused by floating cranes.”

The district government spent three years ridding all its navigation channels of 74 floating cranes and today there are none left.

It also cracked down on all unlicensed docks in the district by the end of 2017. Songjiang now has 15 licensed docks. No docks with potential dangers are allowed to operate.

The district also ordered vessels that had anchored improperly to vacate by April this year.

Garbage is also handled properly.

“We set up garbage storage rooms at every maritime affairs office to offer convenience for boat dwellers. We also ask companies around docks to open restrooms and garbage storage facilities to the boaters,” the official said.

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