Body of Shanghai's missing 4-year-old girl found in Ningbo

Zhu Ying
The body of the 4-year-old girl who went missing on October 4 at a beach in southeast Shanghai was found in a tidal flat in Ningbo, said Shanghai police today.
Zhu Ying
Body of Shanghai's missing 4-year-old girl found in Ningbo

A picture of the girl is posted by her father on Weibo.

The body of a 4-year-old girl who went missing on October 4 while at a beach in southeast Shanghai has been discovered on a tidal flat in Ningbo, according to Shanghai police.

Experts conducted a comprehensive examination of the child's body, while family members were asked to confirm her identity. The physical attributes and clothing of the deceased child closely matched those of the girl surnamed Huang, who was reported missing by her parents on October 4.

Police have indicated that the circumstances surrounding Huang's death appear consistent with drowning, showing no signs of violence. Further investigations are underway.

This tragic incident has evoked an outpouring of sadness and anger among netizens, who have called for legal consequences against the father.

According to the father's account, the family visited Nanhui Beach in the Pudong New Area. He took his daughter to play in the sand, leaving her approximately 20 meters from the seawater for a little more than 10 minutes while he left to retrieve his cell phone. Upon his return, he discovered the girl missing and sought police assistance.

Currently, Chinese criminal law primarily addresses extreme instances of neglect, such as physical abuse or mental torture. However, there exists a legislative void in Chinese criminal law concerning cases of moderate child neglect, particularly those involving the everyday care provided by guardians. To rectify this gap, it is crucial for Chinese legislation and the judiciary to swiftly adapt and enhance the legal framework, said Professor Yuan Bin, deputy director of China Institute of Criminal Law at Beijing Normal University, in an interview with Sanlian Life Week.

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