Show highlights rare, wacky materials

Local residents will find paper that "sings" and walls that smell of fruit at an exhibition featuring over 100 rare and wacky materials at the Shanghai Natural History Museum.
Xinhua

Visitors feel materials on display at Shanghai Natural History Museum.

Local residents will find paper that “sings” and walls that smell of fruit at an exhibition featuring over 100 rare, wacky and cutting-edge materials at the Shanghai Natural History Museum.

The exhibition, entitled “Matter 2.0 — 21st Century Emotional Material” opened yesterday and will last through October 9. More than half of the materials on display are making their public debut in China at the exhibit.

It took designers at Neuni Group nearly eight months to prepare the show, including interactive stations and workshops where people can experience the materials for themselves.

Xinhua

A boy smells a sticker that encapsulates chemicals which generate aromas such as lavender, ketchup, rose, cherry, balm, watermelon, liquor, cream and sea ocean.

In one section, “Maze of Senses,” visitors can see new and creative items such as a film with adjustable transparency, paper boards that produce different weather sounds, and stickers that smell when you scratch them.

In another section, “Haha Land,” visitors can try cloaks and hats made of color-changing material.

“The Safe House” section features samples of materials that promote safety and security, such as shock-absorbing materials, as well as substances used for clothing-safety and anti-counterfeiting purposes.

“The materials making up our life are changing with the breakthroughs brought by science and technology,” said Wu Di, an associate professor at Tongji University and CEO of Neuni. “Besides scientists, now many artists and designers overseas are starting to develop new materials. And we hope the public can also participate in the ‘material revolution’ in the future.”

Wang Rongjiang / SHINE

girls wear clothing made of a material that changes color when light is shone on it. 

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