Exhibitions about Zen patriarch starts in city temple

Some 60 paintings about Huineng (AD 638-713), the sixth and last patriarch of Zen Buddhism in China, are exhibited at the city's Jade Buddha Temple from today.
Ti Gong

Visitors watch the paintings created by Liu Jushi about Huineng (AD 638-713), the sixth and last patriarch of Zen Buddhism in China, at an exhibition at Jade Buddha Temple today.

Some 60 paintings about Huineng (AD 638-713), the sixth and last patriarch of Zen Buddhism in China, are exhibited at the city’s Jade Buddha Temple from today.

The paintings, created by famous Chinese painter Liu Jushi, depict how Huineng was enlightened and promoted Zen Buddhism across China.

“The Zen thinking promoted by Huineng has had profound influences on not only Chinese Buddhism but also traditional Chinese arts and cultures,” said Juexing, the abbot of the temple. The exhibition to run through May 12 aims to help visitors attain inner peace and get enlightened through the stories in the paintings, according to the temple.

Liu spent three years following the life of Huineng and learning about his stories and contributions to create the paintings. Many of the stories are also based on "Tan Jing," or the "Platform Sutra of the Sixth Patriarch," which is the only Buddhist scripture that was composed in China but revered as a sutra.

Ti Gong

A visitor takes photo on a scroll painting created by Liu Jushi about Huineng (AD 638-713), the sixth and last patriarch of Zen Buddhism in China, at an exhibition at Jade Buddha Temple today.

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